A minimum viable development process

Be warned! SAFe is not a development process. Neither is Scrum. And agile development isn’t either. So, if your organization doesn’t have an underlaying development process, going agile, using Scrum or adopting SAFe won’t make your projects more efficient or successful.

The only formalized and proven development process I know is Rational Unified Process (RUP), which is owned and ‘marketed’ by IBM. By ‘marketed’ I mean listed as a commercial product on their website.

RUP grew out of an engineering culture, and I had the fortune to learn it from some of the founders and their closest colleagues while working for many years in Sweden.

As RUP gained recognition in Sweden, I helped clients adopt and tailor it to their needs. One of the challenges with RUP – aside from not being open source – always was that out of the box, following RUP without stripping it down to its core could be tedious and time-consuming.

This was probably also why it failed to become dominant, paving the way for wide-spread misinterpretation of the agile movement. I say misinterpreted, because people who are too lazy to actually learn what agile development is, just hears that agile means ‘write code, not documentation’. And they are too laze to write documentation, so agile must be the right approach?!?

And with SAFe, people with no understanding of development processes can now just create user stories, manage Kanban boards, and do sprint planning. Yayh!

So, I have tried to boil down what a minimum viable development process should entail in terms of necessary work and necessary skills.